HIAS is here to assist you!

Moving to a new neighborhood where you don’t know many people? Often difficult.
Moving to a new country where you don’t know anyone? Always overwhelming.

In an effort to make the immigrant transition into the US more seamless, HIAS printed many pieces of literature over the years* to provide easy-to-use checklists for efficiently tackling various legal processes. The existence of these pamphlets might seem standard, but having accessible, concise steps to immigration success means fewer mistranslated notes, awareness of deadlines, and a better understanding of the help that’s available.

Refugee Policy

Inside, HIAS outlines the official Application Process and the steps that the Washington Processing Center takes when reviewing applications, including lengthy, detailed information on:

  • What’s included on the Preliminary Questionnaire
  • What’s included when asked to fill out an Affidavit of Relationship

What happens after your INS interview

So now that someone has had their INS interview and has been granted either refugee or parole status, HIAS is here to make sure that all the proper steps are taken BEFORE immigrating to the US.

This includes:

  • Completing your first appointment wiht IOM/MPC staff
  • Arranging for a medical examination
  • Obtaining sponsorship (refugees only) and exit permissions from OVIR
  • Making travel arrangements and organizing with your US relatives (if any) to notify the US of your arrival
  • Making a second appointment with IOM/MPC once you are ready to travel

You’ve made it! Here’s how HIAS can help!

HIAS’ help didn’t end with immigrants finding sanctuary on US soil, and didn’t end with immigrants, either! Help was available for both travelers and their US relatives and included:

  • General advice and counsel to both immigrants and their US family members
  • Help with making document corrections, alterations, and replacements (if originals are lost)
  • VISA petition assistance
  • Expediting VISA applications for relatives left in your home country
  • Green card, citizenship, and asylum applications
  • Taking photographs and fingerprints for legal documentation
  • Translation services
  • Specialized legal representation at no cost/minimal cost
  • Scholarship programs (for HIAS-assisted refugees who migrated to the US after 1977)
  • And a handy wallet guide!

*All pamphlets in this post were included in a packet designed for the attendants of the General Assembly of the Council of Jewish Federations, 1992.

 

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When in New York…

On October 30, 1988, the National Conference on Soviet Jewry held its annual Leadership Assembly at the Vista International Hotel in New York. The annual event brought together leaders from the NCSJ’s 50 national constituent agencies, 300 local federations and community councils, as well as Soviet Jewry activists from around the country to deliberate on the issues facing the Soviet Jewry Movement at home and abroad as the USSR went through great change.

Themed “Visions for the Future,” the assembly provided panels on not just cultural topics such as Jewish identity, but provided a forum for practical problem solving like coordinating travel programs, developing effective advocacy, and organizing productive activism.

While processing several folders of handouts, correspondence, publicity for the Assembly, I found this handy list of Kosher restaurants and delis for those attending the assembly that had both dietary restrictions AND a desire to explore the gastronomic gifts of New York City:

For more information on the American Soviet Jewry movement, please visit ajhs.org/aasjm. For more information on AJHS’ Records of the National Conference on Soviet Jewry, please view their finding aid here: http://digifindingaids.cjh.org/?pID=338009#a2.

“Where fine dining is never trivial”
“Revolutionary for young people”
Hickory smoked goose!

With restaurant names such as ‘Edible Pursuits,’ ‘Avi’s Elegant Restaurant,’ and ‘Someplace Special,’ who wouldn’t want to jump in a cab and attempt a culinary adventure?

 

Have you eaten at any of these restaurants?
Let us know in the comments below!

Happy 115th Birthday, HIAS!

1995 marked HIAS’ 115th organizational anniversary, which included not only a larger-than-life Annual board Meeting, but various outings, tours, and galas to commemorate more than a hundred years of exceptional service to Jewish refugees around the world.

In the 1994 HIAS Annual Report, President Martin Kesselhaut and Executive Vice-President Martin A. Wenick remark how proud they are that their current mission statement has held strong over more than a century:

 

“HIAS instills in its clients a true patriotism and love for their adopted country and makes better known to the people of the United States the many advantages of legal immigration.”

 

HIAS accomplished quite a lot in 1994. They partnered with AT&T to fund production of a weekly television show produced by the Russian-American Broadcasting Company, initiated a national Citizenship Project which provided support to naturalization applicants, brokered partnerships with major corporations and Jewish communities as part of their National Corporate Initiative, and participated in their first-ever Leadership Mission to Washington.

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For those involved on the Executive side of the organization, the Annual Membership Meeting was transformed from a traditional presentation-based form to one referred to as a ‘HIAS fair.’ This free-roam meeting format encouraged the Board to directly interact with the departmental staff, creating a personal dialogue to voice concerns, celebrate successes, and cooperatively brainstorm how each department could work together for a bigger and brighter fiscal year ahead. 

For those on the membership side with some time to spend enjoying the city, HIAS organized two days of New York adventures.

NYC-Postcard

Day 1 included:

  • Manhattan walking tour of notable New York Synagogues
  • Trip to Ellis Island, where HIAS representatives were once present to defend those in jeopardy of being deported and/or to accompany immigrants back to HIAS headquarters for shelter
  • Trip to Brighton Beach, which included a walking tour and dinner at a popular Russian restaurant 
  • Tour of the Lower East Side, which included a Kosher lunch at Ratner’s

Day 2 was more centrally located at HIAS’ old headquarters, and included:

  • HIAS Scholarship presentations
  • Building tours of 425 Lafayette Street, HIAS’ home from 1921-1965
  • A group naturalization swearing-in ceremony
  • Annual Membership Meeting, including elections for 1995
  • Guest speaker
  • Board meeting
  • Gala Reception

Since 1995, HIAS has continued to grow and evolve in order to support those who need them most. We can’t wait to see what the next 10 years will bring!